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Welcome to the premier resource for all real estate information and services in the Howard County, Carroll County, Baltimore County, Anne Arundel County and Montgomery County areas. Our team has been selling homes in these areas for 30 years in Ellicott City, Maryland, Columbia,Maryland, Glenwood, Maryland,Elkridge,Maryland, and Laurel, Maryland.  We hope you enjoy your visit and explore everything our realty website has to offer, including all real estate listings, information for homebuyers and sellers, and more About Us, your professional Realtors.

Looking for a new home? Use Quick Search or Map Search to browse an up-to-date database list of all available properties in the area, or use our Dream Home Finder form and We'll conduct a personalized search for you, or you can call us at 410 365-1605 or email us at patsmith22@comcast.net.

If you're planning to sell your home in the next few months, nothing is more important than knowing a fair asking price. We would love to help you with a FREE Market Analysis. We will use comparable sold listings to help you determine the accurate market value of your home. Contact us at patsmith22@comcast.net

We would love to work with you to find you a new home or sell your current home.  

Have a great 2015!

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Real Estate News!!!

Latest Realty News from NAR

Sponsor Webinar: Growing Your Business With a Real Estate CRM

IXACT Contact is a software company that offers CRM and email marketing products to real estate professionals. It’s hosting a webinar on Tuesday, May 22, at 1 p.m., Eastern time, on using its CRM product to grow your business. Shannon McGee, a company business development executive, is the host.

From IXACT:

Wondering exactly how a real estate CRM can help you better manage and grow your business? Join this information-packed webinar and see specific real-world examples of how a robust real estate CRM can make it easy to keep in touch and stay on task with all your clients, prospects, and important referral sources.

In this webinar, IXACT Contact executive Shannon McGee will show you how IXACT Contact’s real estate CRM can help you to:

1. Keep in touch effortlessly with everyone in your database so you stay top of mind.
2. Ensure that you never miss another client birthday or move-in anniversary – both excellent relationship building opportunities.
3. Nurture and stay top of mind with all your prospects so you get the listing and not your competition.
4. Identify high quality leads – hiding in your database!
5. Stay organized and in control of all your listings, closings, and active buyers.
6. [BONUS!] Create a professional online presence and generate leads with your own customizable, mobile friendly, agent website.
7. [DOUBLE BONUS] Double your social media lead generation with automated social media content posting!

Register.

This is a sponsor webinar. REALTOR® Magazine is promoting it, but it isn’t participating in it, hasn’t reviewed the content, and is not endorsing it.

Two Ways You Can Commit a Fair Housing Violation Without Even Knowing It

While the Fair Housing Act’s purpose—barring discrimination in the sale, rental, or financing of residential property—may be easy to understand, navigating the many intricacies of the landmark statute can be tricky even for experienced real estate professionals, said experts on the 1968 law who spoke during a recent event in Fairfax, Va.

The event served as a commemoration of the 50-year anniversary of the signing of the Fair Housing Act, and was organized by the Fairfax County of Human Rights and Equity Programs and sponsored by the Northern Virginia Association of REALTORS®, Legal Services of Northern Virginia, and the Prince William County Human Rights Commission.

Panelists talk about the Fair Housing Act during a training session in Fairfax, Virginia.

The challenges stem from the fact that the law requires real estate professionals to ensure their clients not only have equal access to properties, but also that they drive the selection of the neighborhood or home they want to live in. Even a well-meaning effort to match a client with property you think they would like can have legal consequences.

For example, if you are working with a Korean family that is looking for a home to purchase, taking them to neighborhoods where you know other Asian-Americans live could run afoul of the law if the clients did not specifically ask to go to those neighborhoods. That’s according to attorneys from the Department of Justice’s Civil Rights division and Legal Services of Northern Virginia who served on the panel.

Panelists also advised caution when taking steps aimed at ensuring the safety of your clients. While it might seem reasonable to steer a family with young children away from a home they are looking to buy or rent that has lead-based paint, for instance, doing so would violate the law if the family was aware of the presence of the paint and still wanted to live there. It’s not against the law to market homes with lead-based paint to families with children and let them live there as long as they have been made aware that the hazardous paint is present.

What’s the Best Way to Ensure Appraiser Independence?

Professional appraisals are the foundation on which stable real estate markets are built, so ensuring appraisers are able to do their jobs to the best of their ability is vital to the industry. That’s why a report from the federal government on appraisal quality is welcomed. Two economists with the Federal Housing Finance Agency in a working paper found that appraisals ordered by appraisal management companies, AMCs, are no more likely to be overvalued than appraisals ordered directly by the lender.

“The results indicate no clear evidence of any systematic quality differences between appraisals associated and unassociated with AMCs,” say the economists, Jessica Shui and Shriya Murthy.

Although both types of appraisals have similar levels of overvaluation, according to the researchers, AMC appraisals tend to be more prone to contract price confirmation and super-overvaluation (above 6 percent). And both types have the same level of mistakes, even though AMC appraisals tend to use more comparable properties in the analysis.

AMCs are entities that are intended to let lenders maintain an arm’s length distance between them and the appraiser. They’ve been a part of the industry for decades but it wasn’t until after the mortgage crisis about a decade ago that their use became a big part of the industry. That’s because the Federal Housing Finance Agency entered into an agreement with the state of New York to encourage their use for Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac transactions. Once their use in New York was set, Fannie and Freddie extended it to all of their transactions, making the use of AMCs a national policy. Later, their use became even more standardized by the federal government.

NAR takes the position that AMCs are one way to encourage appraiser independence. Under its Responsible Lending Principles, NAR supports the principles of appraiser independence that AMCs are designed to facilitate, but the association also recognizes that alternatives to AMCs can provide the same conformity to appraiser independence rules.

The FHFA’s report is a top segment in the latest Voice for Real Estate news video from NAR. The video also looks at the upcoming General Data Protection Regulation from the European Union. The rule takes effect later this month and while most web companies have been aware of the rule for a while, for many people it comes as a surprise and they wonder if it’s something they have to concern themselves with. The short answer is, they probably do. That’s because the E.U. has said it plans to enforce it across the board, which means it could try to take action against a company even if it’s American and caters to Americans.

Under the rule, anyone who resides in the European Economic Area is entitled to certain privacy rights. Thus, if you have a website and a European resident comes to it to, say, browse listings, you can’t put a data-tracking cookie on their computer without getting their permission upfront. Right now, that permission is implied and they have to choose to opt out. So, this rule flips current U.S. practices on their head. Instead of them opting out, you have to ask them to opt in.

The rule requires other things as well, but, bottom line, expect to make changes to how you track people who come to your site.

You can expect lawsuits once the E.U. tries to enforce the rule in the United States, but separate from that, large web operations that want to cater to as many people as possible are probably going to make the changes regardless of what the E.U. does. Eventually, that will change the standard in this country.

The video also looks at the latest home sales figures, which are up, despite persistent inventory shortages, and an upcoming webcast NAR is hosting to let people know what REALTORS® will be talking to members of Congress about when they come to Washington for the 2018 Legislative Meetings later this month. There are four talking points: indexing some tax reform provisions to inflation, reauthorizing flood insurance, improving Fair Housing, and protecting net neutrality.

Watch video now.

Can an EU Rule Impact Your Real Estate Business? It Might

What authority does the European Union have over your real estate business? That’s a tricky question, but an E.U. rule that takes effect next month could end up affecting your business in some manner. That’s because any European that comes to your web site to browse listings will be covered by what’s called the GDPR. That stands for General Data Protection Regulation and it won’t let your web site drop a cookie on a European’s computer unless you get affirmative consent. That means a box that says something like, “We use cookies. OK if we put one on your computer?,” has to pop up when someone from the European Economic Area comes to your web site. What’s more, if you process data on a European you have to be ready to delete that data if you’re requested to. That means you have to have a way to identify  that data so you can take the action requested.

As you can imagine, how the EU would enforce this is a big, unanswered question. There will probably be litigation, too. So, it’s possible it will be a while before anything actually happens that affects U.S. businesses. But there are other things to keep in mind. First, the United States might align its rules with the E.U. Second, regardless of that, many U.S. businesses might align their online privacy and security  practices with the E.U. model, regardless of enforcement. That means you’ll probably see more U.S. companies asking for affirmative consent when anyone comes to their web sites. Third, there could be alignment with European rules on data processing, too.

This is all speculation. The rule is real but it’s actual impact here can’t be fully known yet. But you can see where things are heading and it’s not a bad idea to take steps to be prepared for however things shake out.

NAR will be hosting a Facebook Live webcast next week, on Tuesday, April 24, at 1 p.m., Central time (2 p.m., Eastern time) to walk you through what’s happening and what you might do to be ready. The presenters will be Finley Maxson, NAR senior counsel, and Liz Sturrock, NAR vice president of information technology. They’ll be talking with Meg White, managing editor of REALTOR® Magazine.

You’re encouraged to ask questions. Here’s more information on the event: EU Privacy Rule: Are You Impacted?

How Suburbanization Impacts Rural Home Loans

Federally backed home loans from the Rural Housing Service have been called one of the the government’s best kept secrets because buyers can get safe, affordable mortgage financing in areas where few other loan options are available. The underwriting requirements are considered both strong and reasonable, and, maybe most important, homes that wouldn’t be eligible for loans by conventional lenders are often eligible under the federal program. That’s because RHS recognizes that in rural areas, houses are not always built to meet the needs of suburban or urban buyers. The agency’s old name—Farmers Home Administration (FmHA)—says a lot about where the agency is coming from.

That’s why it’s significant that the U.S. Department of Agriculture, which oversees RHS, undertook a reassessment of what constitutes a rural area. That assessment was just completed and in about two months—June 4—a new map of rural areas takes affect. When it does, some areas that used to be considered rural are no longer considered that. One example is Ashburn, Va. Like so many areas in Northern Virginia, it’s being swallowed up by the D.C. metropolitan area. It’s now another suburb.

That means households who might struggle to get financing to buy a home can no longer count on direct or guaranteed loans from RHS. They’ll have to find conventional financing or maybe try FHA.

The good news for buyers in many of these new suburbs is their choice in lenders has probably increased along with the area’s population. In other words, maybe RHS is less needed now, because conventional lenders have moved in to take advantage of the area’s growth. But every area is different. There are probably a number of areas where the choice in lenders hasn’t kept up with growth, so the RHS loans will be missed.

In any case, it makes sense to learn if your area has been affected. The latest Voice for Real Estate news video from NAR talks about this and walks you through how you can see the status of your area.

The video also looks at some things FEMA is doing to encourage growth in private flood insurance options. Thanks in large part to a new consumer advocate in the Federal Emergency Management Agency, the agency said it will allow homeowners to drop their federal coverage and get private coverage instead without incurring any penalty. Prior to this change, you couldn’t do that. You had to keep your federal coverage even if you found cheaper or better private coverage. That consumer advocate, by the way, is there in large part thanks to NAR, which made sure it was part of flood insurance reform legislation that passed a few years ago. We’re now seeing the benefits of that.

In another change, insurance companies that offer the federal coverage can now also offer a private alternative. Again, that wasn’t allowed before. There are a few more improvements like that. The video walks you through them.

Also in the video is an update on competition in the real estate industry. You might recall that it was 10 years ago that NAR and the U.S. Department of Justice entered into an agreement to make sure virtual office websites (VOWs) are treated the same as brick and mortar brokerages in obtaining MLS data to share with people. That agreement expires later this year and the first of two workshops was held in Washington looking at the state of competition today. NAR Associate General Counsel Ralph Holmen (retired) participated in that workshop and made the point that the VOW business model wasn’t a big part of the market 10 years ago and is even smaller today, in part because it involves creating a client relationship with people who want to look at listings on your site. For many brokerages, it’s easier just to offer up listings without having to set up that client relationship first. NAR has said it doesn’t plan to change its VOW policy when that DOJ agreement expires.

The video also excerpts from the NAR Broker Summit that was held in Nashville earlier this month and also introduces a monthly video series NAR is launching for the year, Fair Housing Focus. The video is part of NAR’s recognition of the 50-year anniversary of the Fair Housing Act.

Access and share video.

 

 

 

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Steve Brunett
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410 960-1324
Email:  sbrunett@gmmllc.com
www.gmmllc.com/sbrunett
 

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Jeff Pearce
The Pearce Group
"Your Home Inspection Specialist"
Appt:  410 984-1215
Bus: 301 854-6321
www.thepearcegroup.biz
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Jackie Vaughan and Patrick Smith 
The Jackie Vaughan Team
#1 Team - 12 Years!
with Long & Foster Realtors
Ellicott City Office
Direct:  410 365-1605
Office: 410 461-1456

Email:  patsmith22@comcast.net

Testimonials Page

Hi Patrick, We wanted to take a moment to thank you for all your efforts in finding us a home. Your knowledge of the short sale process and your patience in dealing with all the unexpected events that came up are greatly appreciated. Your advice was valuable and your insights were immensely helpful for us in our decision making process. We will wholeheartedly recommend you to our friends and co-workers who in the market for buying/selling homes. Best Regards, Suthan Suthan and Reji
John and I want to thank you for all you did to help get our home sold. We appreciate your patience in answering our questions and reassuring our concerns. We wish you and Patrick continued success in your real estate partnership. John and Sharon Bouman
When we placed our home in the capable hands of Patrick and Jackie, we had a sales contract in only 12 days. They showed us the utmost patience and respect. They were always available to us when we called and offered the perfect solutions every time. Marian Jeffries
Patrick and Jackie are the perfect example of what Realtors should be! The selling and buying process happened so fast that it made our head spin, but Patrick and Jackie were the consummate professionals and led us through every step. It was wonderful working with Patrick and Jackie and I will always recommend them to friends. Paula and Jonathan Gal-Edd
Dear Long & Foster: agent NOUN: 1. One that acts or has the power or authority to act. 2. One empowered to act for or represent another. While "agent" is an overused term in many industries, few people ever get to experience the thrill, and true power, of agency by representation. In a profession that oftentimes seems haggard, by ignorance of sub-standard practitioners, we are proud to announce that Jackie Vaughan, Patrick Smith and Karey "Vaughan" Thesing exemplify the purest definition of agency, and the highest level of professionalism, for the real estate industry. Simply put, they are the best! Sincerely, Christine and Edward D'Elicio
I thought you would like to know what highly competent professionals you have in your organization. From the beginning to end, their dedication and attention to detail was exemplary. We consider ourselves fortunate to have been associated with your organization and with Patrick and Jackie. Please give them our thanks and gratitude. John O'Donnell
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